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Nr. 2 | 2013 |
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It’s not about driving cars. It’s not about any kind of stand-up
comedy performance. It’s about how to improve the results of an
organisation as a whole. The aim of the new Seatrans Leadership
Concept is to achieve better results in every respect. It is a ques-
tion of how to drive the performance to new heights – on shore
and on board.
‘Our ambition is to take new steps forward in shaping an
organisation where our performance improves on a day-by-
day basis. Through the implementation of various programmes
and projects we have improved. However, we cannot stop
and rest with the results we have achieved to date. For
years it has been a goal to operate in accordance with laws,
regulations and requirements. That has been a reactive way of
working that has limited potential. Today’s safety standards,
competition and business environment demand something
more. It is not a question of complying or not. Compliance is
basically ‘the license to play’ and is a minimum requirement,
not a goal. Seatrans’ ambition is to go ‘beyond compliance’
– meaning excellent. We certainly have to do the right thing.
In order to do something with excellence we have to do the
right thing properly, more smartly, more safely! The rules and
procedures must be complied with, but, in addition, we need
to make everyone look ahead and deal with challenges before
something happens, rather than waiting for someone to be
hurt before acting. Increased focus will be directed towards
how we are behaving while doing our job. Our behaviour has to
be exemplary, too. To reach this stage as a company we need
people that will really commit themselves to behaving in an
exemplary manner. That’s the course we’re going to sail along
towards better performance,’ says Atle Sommer, Managing
Director of Seatrans Ship Management to TransNytt.
Do the right thing properly – and be smarter
The officers and office staff who attended the seminar in Bergen
in May heard the same story. ‘Driving the performance through
leadership’ was the slogan, and it seemed to be welcomed in
the audience, which numbered 35. ‘How many of you believe
that your boss has an influence on your performance?’ It’s a
rhetorical question and everyone agreed: Leaders are crucial for
driving a team’s performance. But how can formal managers and
professionals be great leaders that create excellent results with
their teams? This is a question posed by many top managers
around the globe. The question is just as relevant in an airplane
cockpit, in a hospital surgery, in the manufacturing industry, as it
is in Seatrans. With the ‘licence to play’ in mind, all professionals
have the knowledge and capability to do ‘right things properly’.
That is what’s called ‘compliance’. That is what is expected. ‘The
proof of the pudding is in the eating’, says an English proverb. To
make a ‘tasty pudding’ you need to put something extra into
it. It is the little bit ‘extra’ that makes the difference between
‘compliance’ and ‘exemplary’. (refer to the table)
Shaping behaviour
‘We have focused quite a lot on ‘behaviour-based safety’,
based on a Safety Culture Maturity Assessment throughout the
organisation. This was a very helpful exercise that put us some
steps ahead. Now we will take this a step further. Take a look at
how we behave: In general our behaviour is good, sometimes
it is excellent. However, now and then it is critical. What we
have done is to identify areas of activity and look into each
of the most common and important activities in four areas:
Organisational (shipping business skills), Professional (resource
management), Social and interpersonal (Cooperation) and
Personal (Safety leadership skills and decision-making),’
Sommer explains: ‘By describing what we expect of personal
behaviour in these areas, we have also made a scheme for
evaluating – what behaviour is ‘critical’, what is ‘compliant’,
and what is ‘exemplary’. By letting all employees know what
type of behaviour is expected from them, it will be easier to
adapt to the standards that have been defined. I believe most
employees will do their best to be categorised as ‘exemplary’
rather than ‘critical’ or ‘compliant’. In that way this concept
will shape behaviour and drive performance simply by being
implemented.
Driving
performance
Non-technical skills
Non-technical skills reflect interpersonal (e.g. communication,
teamwork, and leadership) and cognitive skills (i.e. decision-making
and situational awareness), that complement the professional’s
technical skills. Non-technical skills refer to the human factors
that may influence job performance, but which are distinct from
the technical or practical skills required to complete a task.
DID YOU KNOW?
In the UK in 2000 approximately 10% of patients were harmed in
some way while being cared for by the National Health Service –
equivalent to 850,000 patients. The cost for additional days in
hospital beds was calculated at NOK 20 million.
DID YOU KNOW?
A UK survey from 2003 showed that poor communication between
members of the surgical team was the cause for 43% of the non-
conformities registered.
DID YOU KNOW?
The European Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA) started the
development of a NOTECHS (non-technical skills) assessment for
pilots in civil aviation in 1998. The reason is that ‘during the last
decade the aviation community has put considerable emphasis
on flight crew members’ non-technical skills as a crucial factor for
enhanced safety.’ (Rhona Flin et al, Position paper, Human Factors
and Aerospace Safety 97-117, 2003)
DID YOU KNOW?
‘Recent developments in surgical literature highlight the need
for assessment of non-technical skills in surgery. Assessment
of surgical non-technical skills is becoming a training priority.
The present evidence suggests that the revised NOTECHS scale
exhibits good reliability.’ The American Journal of Surgery, Vol 166,
2008
Critical
Compliance
Exemplary
Safety leadership
skills
Intervention
Decision-making
Problem definition
Cooperation
Team building
Never stops unsafe
acts of crew members
Never gathers enough
information to clearly
identify the problem
Never supports crew
members in speaking
out confidently to fully
understand the problem
Never encourages input
and feedback from other
crew members
Never makes personal
abilities, strengths and
weaknesses transparent
to team members
Hesitates to make
personal abilities,
strengths and
weaknesses transparent
to team members
Often makes personal
abilities, strengths and
weaknesses transparent
to team members
Sometimes encourages
other crew members to
give input and feedback
Often encourages other
crew members to give
input and feedback
Sometimes upports
crew members in
speaking out confidently
to fully understand the
problem
Always supports crew
members in speaking
out confidently to fully
understand the problem
Sometimes gathers
enough information
to clearly identify the
problem
Always gathers enough
information to clearly
identify the problem
Often stops unsafe
acts of crew members
Always stops unsafe
acts of crew members
EXAMPLES OF:
Seatrans
Leadership Skills
We
certainly
have to
do the
right
thing. In
order to do
something
with
excellence
we
have to do the
right
thing
properly, more
smartly
, more
safely
!